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The Times, Wednesday, Nov 14, 1928; pg. 11; Issue 45050; col F


                GIRL'S BODY IN MANHOLE
                         -----------------
    EVIDENCE OF FOUL PLAY AT INQUEST.

An inquest on the body of SARAH CORLETT, a 19-year-old farm servant, of Arlecdon, Cumberland, whose body was found in an underground reservoir at Lamplugh, was held yesterday at Asby, near Whitehaven.

John CORLETT, the girl's father, said that when she did not come home on October 16 he concluded that as the night was dark and foggy she had remained at the farm. The next day he was told that she was missing, and he informed the police. He had searched for the girl every day since, but had been unable to find anyone who saw her after leaving the farm.

Robert GILL, the girl's employer, said that the girl had worked for him for two years. There were three men servants on the farm. The girl was a good servant. He had heard that she had a young man, but he did not come to the house, and the witness had only seen him once. He went to the reservoir, which was on his land, two days after the girl had disappeared and looked in. It was the only manhole that would screw off.

George ASHBRIDGE, surveyor to the Arlecdon Council, said that the last time the reservoir was cleaned out was in July, 1926. Jonathan ATKINSON, the road man who found the body, said that he had to use a key to unscrew the manhole. After drawing off the water they found a clog and then the body.

Dr. A. G. HENDERSON, the police surgeon, who conducted the post-mortem examination, said that the body appeared to have been in the water for about a month. Around the neck he found a bloodstained camisole, the back half of which was twisted. An examination of the body revealed a wound on the top of the head 2¼ in. long. It had a ragged edge, and was probably caused by a blunt instrument, and was sufficient to account for death. It could not have been caused by the girl falling into the water.

The inquest was then adjourned for four weeks to enable the police to make further inquiries.