CATECHISM AND
DISESTABLISHMENT.
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 Mr. Joseph BOWMAN, of Cockan, writes to entirely agree with a “Churchwoman,” because, he says, of the effect, our remarks as to “betters” may have upon the Disestablishment Bill.
 
 What the connection is between a clause in the church Catechism and the Disestablishment Bill, we do not perceive. Mr. BOWMAN thinks it is difficult to see how a rich brother who has given something to a poor brother can order himself lowly and reverently towards him.
 
 Christian ethics are necessarily difficult. It is difficult to shoot and hit a distant bull’s eye; but we aim at the bull’s eye all the same. If we may be permitted to do so, the Bishop of Carlisle in his own person is a very conspicuous example showing that what is difficult is not impossible, for he supplements by example what the Catechism lacks in precept as to the conduct of “betters,” at the same time observing all that is best in the recognition of a proper respectful precedence.