The funds for the New Mission Room at Moresby are coming in fairly
well, about £150 having been raised.


**

       We understand the marriage of Miss. BURNS-LINDOW to Mr. HEINMANN will
take place at Irton Parish Church on Tuesday February 4th.


**

       Captain BRAGG has been confined to his house at Bassenthwaite since
Friday last, when he was suddenly taken ill.


**

       About fifty men at the Crosshow Colliery, Dearham, struck work on
Monday morning against a proposed reduction of wages.


**

       About £800 of the £1,300 required to build the Victoria Memorial
Hospital at Maryport has been raised.


**

       Mr. J. WRIGHT, Keekle, had an accident in Tangier Street on Saturday
morning, through his horse slipping and falling.


**

       The Whitehaven hockey team beat Dalton in the return match at Dalton
on Saturday by three goals to one.


**

       The death took place on Sunday of Mr. G. H. DIXON, of Armathwaite
Hall, near Carlisle. The deceased gentleman was the last surviving son of Mr. John DIXON, one of the firm of Peter DIXON and Sons, cotton manufacturers in
Carlisle for many years.


**

       News wanted of Sarah Ellen MILBURN, last heard of at Bishop Auckland,
County Durham, Durham, about 1868, also of Kate, sister of above, who left
Whitehaven, Cumberland, to work in the mills in Lancashire. Should this meet the eye of anyone knowing their whereabouts, news would be thankfully received by their brother, John MILBURN, care of Editor of "Reynolds Newspaper."


**

       A supplement to the "Gazette" issued on Monday night gives an
alphabetical list of over 7,000 addresses and resolutions which were received by the Home Secretary from public bodies and societies expressing sympathy with the King and the Royal Family on the death of Queen Victoria, and congratulations to the King on his accession to the throne.


 Mr. BALFOUR has been suffering from a second attack of influenza, and
has been confined to the house until the last few days. He had sufficiently
recovered on Monday to travel to Sandringham on a visit to the King.


**

       From an agony column: "The gentleman who took the wrong overcoat in
mistake from 4-45 train to Staines on the 24th will greatly oblige rightful
owner if he will forward the tab remembrance.


**

       Mrs. Elizabeth WILMOT, of Kirkby Laythorpe, South Lincolnshire,
celebrated her 102nd birthday last week. She is healthy and active and can do many things which would embarrass people twenty years her junior. She is fond of knitting and sewing and not long ago took a prize for needlework at a local industrial exhibition.


**


       Colonel SCHIEL, who was in command of the German contingent at
Elandslaagate, has told this story:

       He was lying in a row of wounded Boers guarded by a Gordon Highlander,
who whenever he came near stopped and deliberately spat on the ground.

       "Can't you see I am wounded?" said the colonel.

       Instantly the soldier dropped on his knees, wrapped his blanket round
the wounded enemy, gave him his water bottle, and, standing up said, "You
should have told me that before. Now I've gien ye ma blanket, an' I've gien ye ma water-bottle; but mind, we're no friends."


**

       It was reported at a meeting of the Manchester Gas Committee on Friday
that during December, ten tons of copper had been collected from the
prepayment meter. The total number of coppers was 1,107,068.


**

       Mr. William PETRIE, Point Street, Larne, who celebrated his 101st
birthday on the 5th of June last, died on Friday at his residence. Mr. PETRIE, who had never been further than Belfast had 13 children, 50 grandchildren, and 8 great grandchildren.