THE PITMEN'S STRIKE.


    Nothing of importance has transpired since our last, relative to
the unfortunate differences existing between the pitmen and their late
employers. A great many Welsh pitmen, accompanied by their wives and
children, arrived here by a special train from Carlisle on Tuesday
night, and were conveyed the same night, by a special train of the
Newcastle and Nort Shields Railway, to Percy Main, and from thence by a
train to Seghill.

    The next day they were divided amongst Seghill, Seaton Delayal, and
Cramlington collieries. Every succeeding week increases the number of
fresh men introduced into the trade, and augments the distress and
misery of the pitmen and their wives and families, without affording
the slightest ground of hope that the strike will be speedily
terminated. Already upwards of three thousand three hundred men are at
work, who,  but for this "turn-out" would never have been employed in
the collieries  and many of them probably would have never come into
the district at all.

A military force of cavalry and infantry marched, from the barracks
here, on Thursday, to Whitridge, which is situated between Seaton
Delaval and Seghill, for the purpose of suppressing any attempts to
create turbulence there. The pitmen are in a miserable condition, and
suffer daily the greatest privations, but still they prefer to starve
in the union, than return to their employment. - Newcastle Journal.
 
 
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