CONDUCT OF MINISTERS TOWARDS
THE PRINCE REGENT
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       "His Royal Highness will consider the situation in which his servants
have placed him. They have thrown away his approbation upon an act, on which
the whole country, and the first men in the country, still call for an
investigation as boldly and pertinaciously as if no Royal opinion had ever been
promulgated. We do not speak of the Radical Reformers. They and the ministers are
the two parties. Has not his Royal Highness a right to complain of this? Has he
not a right to say to his ministers - 'Sirs, why have you thus hazarded my
name in a case which was not clear, and in which I now see I have the most
honourable men in the country opposed to me? Why did you place me in a situation, in
which you must have known that my name would want its due Constitutional
weight?  Is it to be borne that I, in the month of November, should now have to
receive addresses from all the counties in England, calling for inquiry into
those occurrences upon which you had made me decide on the 21st of August, four
days after those events had taken place? That those addresses should be signed
by people of the highest consequence in the country,  and put also into my own
hand by the first Nobleman of the land?'

       Will not his Royal Highness, we say, if not openly, yet in his heart,
and secretly, thus interrogate and catechise Ministers? And what can be their
reply? Why that they have a method of silencing the demand for inquiry: for
that they have displaced from his office, one of the most venerable and
respectable Noblemen in the land (as an example to others) who had dared to move for
an inquiry into those circumstances upon which they in his Royal Highness'
name  had long ago decided; and that therefore their decision, before
investigation, when given in the name of the Prince, was better than a decision after
investigation, when called for by the people."

       So far the Times; but if there be any truth in a report which does not
want circumstances of probability, the foregoing speech of the Prince Regent
is not wholly hypothetical.

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