MR. FROUDE'S
"LIFE OF CARLYLE."

   The first portion of Mr. FROUDE's "Life of Carlyle"  will, it is
announced, be issued in short time. Although the interest of any  biography of the
great author must of necissity be impaired by the publication  of his
"Reminiscenses," there is still much to be said about Thomas CARLYLE  which the world
would like to hear, and there is nobody who can say it so well  as Mr. FROUDE.
But it is to be hoped that the weak nerves of the gentle critics  of Cockneydom
will be braced up before the issue of the two volumes now promised  to us; or
otherwise  we may again have an exhibition as discreditable to  the
intelligence and common sense of literary London as was that which we  witnessed last
year.

   Most of the persons who then joined in a ridiculous  outcry against Mr.
FROUDE for having published and Mr. CARLYLE for having  written that marvellous
record of a wonderful life, in which both the greatness  and littleness of
the character of the writer were depicted with photographic  accuracy, must now
feel heartily ashamed of themselves. It is too much to hope  that they will
show rather more  of the critical faculty and rather less of  hysterical
sentimentalism when they are next called upon to deal with some  chapters in the
biography of Mr. CARLYLE?