Sir William WORSLEY is a gentleman whose views upon the  political questions
of the day have at least the merit of  originality.

 Addressing a meeting of Conservatives at York on Monday  night, he seems to
have distinguished himself greatly by the display of  perspicacity which has
enabled him to detect designs on the part of Mr.  GLADSTONE which have hitherto
been hidden from the rest of the  world.

 It appears that the Prime Minister’s object in  introducing an institution
with a “nasty humbugging French name” is to “shut-up”  the House of Commons
and the Nation. Intoxicated by the example of France, Mr.  GLADSTONE desires to
force all manner of French institutions upon this  country.

 Sir William solemnly warned his hearers of the  inevitable consequences. “
All over France at this moment they saw most violent  attempts at anarchy and
confusion;” and, in his opinion, it is evident that we  shall soon see a similar
state of things in England if we once allow Mr.  GLADSTONE to carry the

 Sir William WORSLEY’s originality, as we have said is  remarkable; but it
must be confessed that the worthy Baronet’s speeches ought to  be allowed to get
to the print. The bogey of French Revolution may still  frighten a roomful of
children or farm laborers; but it is sadly out of place in  the columns of
the daily press.

 The next time Sir William wishes to flaunt the  antiquated French spectre
before the eyes of his friends, he should be careful  to do it in private,
unless he wishes to make himself ridiculous.