About a fortnight ago, an extraordinary story was told in the Deemster’s Court, Douglas, Isle of Man, when an old lady, named Annie BRADLEY, sought to escape imprisonment for debt, in consequence of her age and infirmities. She was a tenant of a furnished house at £100 a year, but had paid no rent; and her daughter, in the witness box, admitted that they had been tenants in the same way at Bowden, in Cheshire, and at Tranmere, and had left each place in debt.
 At Tranmere her mother had pledged the plate, and had been sentenced to three months imprisonment. Twelve months ago she got gold watches from jewellers there, and had made presents of them. She alleged that she had lent a large sum of money to Mr. John BRADLEY, solicitor, or solicitor’s clerk, in Liverpool, but this, that person utterly denies.
 The mother left the island on Monday, and the same day the daughter, Annie BRADLEY, a person about forty years of age, was arrested on the charge of obtaining two watches by false pretenses from Mr. SWINNERTON, a local jeweller. The complainant proved that she represented to him that her mother had a quarterly ?????, which would fall due in a few weeks after the goods were supplied, and that he would be paid out of this money. One of the watches had been returned; the other, she represented had been sent to a niece. On the faith of this representation he had supplied the watches.
 It was proved by a shorthand writer that in the Deemspter’s Court the defendant swore that her mother had no income, and that they were dependant on the charity of relatives and friends. A servant in the employ of the BRADLEYs deposed that the defendant had told her the watches had been sent to two nieces, and she told her that one watch was in the custody of Mr. BENNETT, 49 Princess-street, Manchester, who was in the habit of coming to see BRADLEY. She said that she owed him £6, and he would not part with the watch until this was paid. The prisoner made a statement denying the assertion of the complainant. She was committed for trial.